Man Discovers Incredible Hidden Fortune Inside Tank He Bought For Just $38K

Nick Mead and Todd Chamberlain got more than they bargained for when they bought a tank on eBay. Nick, who runs Tanks-a-lot in Helmdon, Northants, bought the tank for a bargain at £30,000 [$38,000].

Nick was filming Todd as he fished around inside the tank. Both men were expecting Todd to pull out weapons of some sort, so imagine their surprise when he pulled out bars of gold instead! Bar after bar were pulled out, with excited Nick filming the whole thing.

“Well, it’s not guns that’s for sure,” Todd said.

“Is that what I think it is? How heavy is it? Seriously?! Is that gold? Oh god, that’s about five or six kilos. Wow, good here init [sic],” Nick exclaimed.

“See how many there are, find the rest! Yeehaah! What are we going to do with them? “

“Oh my God. I don’t believe it,  what do you reckon they’re worth? Where did they come from?  It could be Kuwaiti or Iraqi.”

“How many more are there? This is better than having puppies! Incredible.”

Todd Chamberlain proudly displays one of the glistening bars he had discovered in the old Iraqi tank at the Tanks-a-Lot site in Northamptonshire
As Mr Chamberlain pulled out bar after bar Nick Mead exclaimed 'It's better than having puppies.' But he later admitted on camera that the pair were unlikely to be able to keep the gold (pictured)
As Mr Chamberlain pulled out bar after bar Nick Mead exclaimed ‘It’s better than having puppies.’ But he later admitted on camera that the pair were unlikely to be able to keep the gold (pictured)

Of course, after all the excitement had died down, the question arose as to what they should do with all the bullion. They speculated on spending it on cars are other things, but they knew that they would not be allowed to keep it. Something about taking it down to ‘Cash Convertors’ one bar at a time, might just set alarm bells ringing!

“It’s not something I’d thought I’d be doing, finding b***** great bars of gold hidden in a tank. Absolutely incredible.”

“But, we’ve got to ring the police. I don’t know whether this is millions or hundred of thousands worth. But one thing is for certain, I don’t want it lying around my office.”

“We’ll get a receipt and hopefully, just hopefully, we’ll get to keep it. What’s the chance of us keeping it?”

Off camera, some one replies: “Absolutely zero.”

“We didn’t know what to do. You can’t exactly take five gold bullion bars down to Cash Converters without questions being asked, so we called the police,” shared Todd.

So after taking more pictures and the video of their find, they did the honourable thing and called the police. As Nick explained, the bullion was worth millions and he really did not want it lying around his office.

The Chinese-made T54 tank was sold on eBay for around £30,000 by Joe Hewes, pictured, who bought it 'ruined' and restored it
The Chinese-made T54 tank was sold on eBay for around £30,000 [$38,000] by Joe Hewes, pictured, who bought it ‘ruined’ and restored it
Despite missing out on the 'goldmine' sitting in the tank, Mr Hewes said he was not bitter but did expect a pint from Mr Mead 
Despite missing out on the ‘goldmine’ sitting in the tank, Mr Hewes said he was not bitter but did expect a pint from Mr Mead
Mr Mead phoned the police after finding the gold and it is now being kept in a safety deposit box in London
Mr Mead phoned the police after finding the gold and it is now being kept in a safety deposit box in London

It seems that the tank had in fact been already restored by the previous owner, but he had not even seen the gold stashed away inside. He had only replaced the tracks and the engine, not even looked inside. Nick, who has a collection of some 150 military vehicles, said that he had traded an army lorry and an Abbot self-propelled gun for the tank.

“It’s crazy and a great find so I hope they get to keep it,” said Joe Hewes who sold the tank to Nick.

“Everyone is thinking I should be devastated to have missed out on what could be a fortune but I’m not too upset because I made a fair bit of money on the tank anyway.”

“I haven’t been in touch with Nick but if he does get to keep some of the some of the money, I expect a pint!”

Pictured: Mr Chamberlain weighs the gold, which was later estimated to be worth around £2million
Pictured: Mr Chamberlain weighs the gold, which was later estimated to be worth around £2million ($2.5 million)
Nick Mead (pictured left) and mechanic Todd Chamberlain with the tank. They found the gold inside the diesel tank, which they had just removed
Nick Mead (pictured left) and mechanic Todd Chamberlain with the tank. They found the gold inside the diesel tank, which they had just removed

Judging by the weight of the bullion , they reckoned it was worth about £2 million ($2.5 million), although Nick doubted that they would even get a finders fee for handing it in.

“We know it is definitely an Iraqi tank and our theory is the gold is from Kuwait but we don’t know,” Nick said.

“When we found it, we were all laughing and joking and deciding what we were going to spend the money on.”

“My sister wanted a Land Rover and I would buy a Rolls Royce Phantom and chop the back off to make a pick-up truck.”

An Iraqi T-72 tank rumbles down a road near Baghdad in 2003, prior to the invasion by a US-led coalition. Many of Saddam Hussein's tanks were left behind in Kuwait after British and American forces liberated the country in 1991 (file picture)
An Iraqi T-72 tank rumbles down a road near Baghdad in 2003, prior to the invasion by a US-led coalition. Many of Saddam Hussein’s tanks were left behind in Kuwait after British and American forces liberated the country in 1991 (file picture)
Nick Mead (pictured) bought the tank after spotting it on eBay. He found the gold hidden inside the diesel tank
Nick Mead (pictured) bought the tank after spotting it on eBay. He found the gold hidden inside the diesel tank

The history of the tank is unclear, it is a Chinese copy of the Russian T54 design, built in the 1980’s, and had just 1507 miles on it. It may have been that the gold was stolen by Iraqi soldiers during the raid on Kuwait in 1990, but that remains to be proven.

“I saw it advertised and I had this idea of doing a ‘From Russia With Love’ experience where people would come and drive three Russian tanks,” Nick said.

“I always keep an eye on military vehicles on EBay, I check it once every three days. I often sell tanks on EBay and I buy from there too.”

“It is unusual to get one of these now, they range from around £10k [$12, 800] to £60k [$76, 700]. I did well buying it for £30k. [$38,000]”

Mr Mead bought the tank after trading it for an Army lorry and an Abbot self-propelled gun (pictured)
Mr Mead bought the tank after trading it for an Army lorry and an Abbot self-propelled gun (pictured)

After posting their find on a social media platform, Nick says they had some interesting comments, and even one reply from a person who said that he was a colonel in the British Army, and the tank belonged to him.

“It’s all very much up in the air at the moment,” Mr Mead said. “It’s very early days and I’m not sure what will happen yet.”

The police, after issuing a full receipt for it, now have the gold in a safe place. When asked about it, the Northants police said that due to ‘operational reasons’ they were unable to comment on the bullion.

“The chances of us keeping it are very slim,” Nick said.

“I’ve had quite a few strange phone calls.”

“I got a call from one person claiming to be a colonel in the British Army saying it was his.”

“It’s really good fun to have found it. It certainly is interesting.”

Source: Daily Mail

Meet The 28-Year-Old London Banker Who Is The Youngest Person To Travel To All 196 Countries

He started travelling in 2008 and spent a whopping £125,000 to achieve his dream. Over the course of five years James Asquith, the 24-year-old, who is now 28 and works as banker in London, managed to visit all 196 countries. Last year, he received a Guinesss World Record for becoming the youngest person in the world to travel to all sovereign countries.

However, according to James that was never the plan. “It was never the purpose to race around and hop into every country to tick it off,” he said. Instead, he got the idea after he had travelled a few times with his father who was an airline pilot for BMI (British Midland International). “I thought, ‘I want to see more,’ and eventually decided I wanted to go everywhere,” he said.

From an early age James had saved his money by doing odd jobs such as car washing. As an adult, he continued to save and at 18 he finally had enough money to travel. What started as a three month trip with friends carried on to become an around-the-world trip that lasted him five years!

Having saved "a decent amount of cash" by the age of 18, Asquith took a gap year to travel with friends before starting university, spurring him to continue travelling around the world.
Having saved “a decent amount of cash” by the age of 18, Asquith took a gap year to travel with friends before starting university, spurring him to continue travelling around the world.

“When it started, I remember going to get our backpacks and the guy in the shop saying, ‘Get this one, you’ll catch the travel bug and it will be durable.’ I thought, ‘No, it’s just going to be a three-month trip.’ Two days after I came back I booked my first solo trip and went to Egypt.”

James’s Dad was a pilot working for BMI, meaning he got to tag along to destinations he otherwise may not have visited.

Asquith's Dad was also a pilot working for BMI (British Midland International), meaning he got to tag along to destinations he otherwise may not have visited.

“They went direct to Sierra Leone, Ethiopia, Iraq, Kazakhstan – places that were pretty expensive to get to and that I’d normally never have gone to,” he said.

When James began travelling with his dad, he always thought that he would like to see more. Even travelling without his dad, he would head off to weird places, just because he could.

“I started going away with my Dad when I could, or even without him, on these weird route networks. I thought, ‘I want to see more,’ and eventually thought, ‘Now I want to go everywhere.'”

He managed to continue traveling during his time at The London School of Economics, where he studied a BSc in Economics.
He managed to continue traveling during his time at The London School of Economics, where he studied a BSc in Economics.

“Initially I was living with my parents, so I saved money on rent there,” he said. “I worked three jobs at one point, and I started up a student events business in my second year which turned out to be lucrative — that’s what made it happen.”

Some of his most memorable trips include visiting Middle Eastern countries like Jordan and Syria.
Some of his most memorable trips include visiting Middle Eastern countries like Jordan and Syria.

“Syria was lovely when I went in 2011,” he said. “I stayed in the Sheraton in Damascus and it was a completely different place back then. So many places have changed massively — I went to Kurdistan in north Iraq, which from what I hear in the press is now an awful place, but my photos of it are beautiful.”

James has tried to spend at least one day or a night in every country he has been to, and he has fond memories of many places.

Some of his loneliest days were spent in Africa, which he says he has "fond, strange memories" of.
Some of his loneliest days were spent in Africa, which he says he has “fond, strange memories” of.

“It was probably the loneliest place — I broke up with an ex-girlfriend the day before I went there, and I went for four month by myself. I didn’t speak a word of English for about the first two months — there was a large aspect of solitude and a lot of self-reflection.”

He tried to spend a least a day or a night in every country.
He tried to spend a least a day or a night in every country.

“There were obviously some that I spent less time in — I went to Afghanistan during a war — but some I spent months in. I got a flavour of every country.”

To boost his travel funds, James took to dabbling on the stock market and openly admits he had no clue what he was doing. It seemed to work though, because he manages to fund his travelling very well.

However, finding the funding to keep up his hobby wasn't always easy, so when the financial crisis hit, Asquith took his chances on the stock market.
However, finding the funding to keep up his hobby wasn’t always easy, so when the financial crisis hit, Asquith took his chances on the stock market.

“I didn’t have a clue what I was doing but I bought a few stocks from UK banks when they were on their knees and I got really lucky,” he said. “I managed to make a fair amount of money from that and basically spent it all traveling.”

He also become obsessed with finding deals.
He also become obsessed with finding deals.

“A lot of people write articles about how you can trick the system — I wouldn’t read too much into that, just keep looking for deals all the time,” he said. “The first thing I do is search on Skyscanner ‘London to Everywhere.'”

He also suggests signing up to airline emails to take advantage of their sales. “They obviously use their cheapest, super-discounted seats to promote their sales, and there are very few tickets that are at the price that they advertise, but they do have tickets at those prices.”

Becoming familiar with different, cheaper airlines also helped him reach his goal.
Becoming familiar with different, cheaper airlines also helped him reach his goal.

“Older legacy airlines from Europe and the US are, in my opinion, way behind the curve of the Middle Eastern three,” he said. “The Asian airlines and the Middle Eastern airlines are absolutely spot on.

“European budget airlines work for sure, but Asian budget airlines are amazing. Air Asia got me just about everywhere for so little.”

"A lot of people assume I had rich parents who gave me money," he said, adding that this was never the case.
“A lot of people assume I had rich parents who gave me money,” he said, adding that this was never the case.

“My parents helped me as much as they could in various ways, but I certainly didn’t get any handouts. It obviously helps when you get financial help with the airfare, but a lot of the places I went for five months or something like that and was on a shoestring to get by.”

“I worked in bars and hostels when I was in South America so I got food, drink, and accommodation for free — when you’re backpacking, there’s not really much else you’re spending money on.”

After university, he started working for HSBC in London. It was during this time that he visited his last country, Micronesia.
After university, he started working for HSBC in London. It was during this time that he visited his last country, Micronesia.

“I probably took about six different trips that were four or five months in length,” he said. “I was 18 when it started, and finished when I was 24 and some amount of days.”

When he set foot in the final country, James said he had a very empty feeling, and not what he had expected to feel. “It was a really weird feeling — I felt quite empty. I always joked that I would have a mid-life crisis at a young age, but it almost felt like that.”

“It got quite big quite quickly,” he said. “I got a lot of weird requests like, ‘Come and DJ on our radio station in Sydney,’ or ‘Come on the ‘The One Show.’ That was certainly not for me.”

The long vetting process involved providing visas, passports, tickets, witness statements, photos of himself in every country, and even returning to a lot of the countries he had already visited to beg for stamps in his passport.
The long vetting process involved providing visas, passports, tickets, witness statements, photos of himself in every country, and even returning to a lot of the countries he had already visited to beg for stamps in his passport.

“There were times when I went to five countries in a day just for the purposes of getting a stamp,” he said, adding, “I didn’t have tickets from everywhere. I paid people in a jeep to take me to Somalia — it’s not like I was going to turn around and say, ‘Can I have a receipt please?'”

The Guinness Book of Records finally recognised him, as did RecordSetter, which is the second biggest organisation to recognise records such as this. James says that it was a wonderful moment when he received an email from Guinness to say he had set a new the record!

Then, last year, he finally received his Guinness World Record.

“I got an email saying ‘Congratulations, you’ve got a Guinness World Record.’ It was amazing.”

With the record under his belt, he began writing his book, Breaking Borders.
With the record under his belt, he began writing his book, Breaking Borders.

“Everyone can write a travel book and there’s lots of travel blogs out there, so I needed it to be official,” he said. “I spent pretty much all of last year writing it — I started to do it while I was at work, but I realised it wasn’t conducive to sitting in meetings talking about financial markets then coming home to write about the most amazing thing I’ll probably ever do in my life.”

“So I took loads of trips and basically just got in the mindset of writing while I was on them — I spent three and a half weeks in the South Pacific just sitting on the beach writing.”

As far as choosing a favourite country, Asquith says the US stands out because of its diversity, and is also the country he has travelled to the most.
As far as choosing a favourite country, Asquith says the US stands out because of its diversity, and is also the country he has travelled to the most.

“If Europe was a country, it would be Europe because of the difference between Spain, Italy, Scandinavia… it’s massively diverse, but it’s the same from New York to Texas, Las Vegas, Alaska, and Hawaii. I think I’ve been to 29 states.”

Next, Asquith says he would like to visit the North and South Pole, and has a trip to Puerto Rico planned within the next few months.
Next, Asquith says he would like to visit the North and South Pole, and has a trip to Puerto Rico planned within the next few months.

“I want to do something more extreme now, some sort of crazy marathon or something,” he said. “I’m not going to be in a sail boat going across the Atlantic any time soon, but something a bit more edgy I guess.”

"I'm an expert on very few places," he said, "but I still get really excited."
“I’m an expert on very few places,” he said, “but I still get really excited.”

“There are going to be so many other places that amaze me. There’s so much more to see.”

Source: Business Insider

‘Evil Does In Fact Die,’ Family Says In Man’s Obituary

Most of us are used to all the sugar-coated clichés usually found in obituaries. After all, many people are too uncomfortable to speak ill of the dead. But that’s not always the case, as one deceased man’s family proves.

When Leslie Ray ‘Popeye’ Charping passed away, his obituary wasn’t filled with any of the usual platitudes. Instead, his obituary made it quite clear that his family won’t miss him in the slightest. The obituary starts off explaining that Charping lived 29 years longer than he deserved to, and died of cancer because he was a “horse’s ass”.

It goes on to accuse him of being a bad parent, a womanizer and having mental illnesses. It also says Charping was “committed” to alcohol and drugs, only joined the Navy to avoid prison and was generally offensive. But it doesn’t end there: his family are not even having a memorial service for the hated man. 

“Leslie Ray ‘Popeye’ Charping was born in Galveston on November 20, 1942 and passed away January 30, 2017, which was 29 years longer than expected and much longer than he deserved.  Leslie battled with cancer in his latter years and lost his battle, ultimately due to being the horses ass he was known for.  He leaves behind 2 relieved children; a son Leslie Roy Charping and daughter, Shiela Smith along with six grandchildren and countless other victims including an ex wife, relatives, friends, neighbors, doctors, nurses and random strangers.

“At a young age, Leslie quickly became a model example of bad parenting combined with mental illness and a complete commitment to drinking, drugs, womanizing and being generally offensive.  Leslie enlisted to serve in the Navy, but not so much in a brave & patriotic way but more as part of a plea deal to escape sentencing on criminal charges.  While enlisted, Leslie was the Navy boxing champion and went on to sufficiently embarrass his family and country by spending the remainder of his service in the Balboa Mental Health Hospital receiving much needed mental healthcare services.

“Leslie was surprisingly intelligent, however he lacked ambition and motivation to do anything more than being reckless, wasteful, squandering the family savings and fantasizing about get rich quick schemes.  Leslie’s hobbies included being abusive to his family, expediting trips to heaven for the beloved family pets and fishing, which he was less skilled with than the previously mentioned.  Leslie’s life served no other obvious purpose, he did not contribute to society or serve his community and he possessed no redeeming qualities besides quick whited sarcasm which was amusing during his sober days.

“With Leslie’s passing he will be missed only for what he never did; being a loving husband, father and good friend.  No services will be held, there will be no prayers for eternal peace and no apologizes to the family he tortured.  Leslie’s remains will be cremated and kept in the barn until ‘Ray,’ the family donkey’s wood shavings run out.  Leslie’s passing proves that evil does in fact die and hopefully marks a time of healing and safety for all.”

Powerful Images From The 1940s Show How The US Traveled Before The Epoch Of Cheap Flights

Have you ever wondered how America travelled before airplanes? In this collection of photographs, you will find may photographs of that bygone era, when buses were the main method of transport.

Photos taken from the 1940’s by Esther Bubley show Americans travelling on buses to and from work, and between cities. During the time of rationing of gasoline and rubber, buses were used extensively by most people. Even soldiers used them as the accepted means of transport.

The collection earned Bubley the award for Best Picture Sequence in ‘News Pictures of the Year in 1948’. The pictures give us a subtle glance at family life and the racial segregation roles of the time.

This amazing collection showcases life back then, when there were less travel options. A trip from Washington DC to Pittsburgh would take about five hours, compared to a regular non stop flight which now takes an hour!

Greyhound drivers take a break between runs at the station in Columbus, Ohio. Bubley was joined by photographers Roy Stryker, Gordon Parks and John Vachon on the voyage 
Greyhound drivers take a break between runs at the station in Columbus, Ohio. Bubley was joined by photographers Roy Stryker, Gordon Parks and John Vachon on the voyage
A sign pointing to a 'Colored Waiting Room' at a the Greyhound station in Rome, Georgia. It still took two decades more before racial segregation in the US was outlawed completely with the Civil Rights Act of 1964
A sign pointing to a ‘Colored Waiting Room’ at a the Greyhound station in Rome, Georgia. It still took two decades more before racial segregation in the US was outlawed completely with the Civil Rights Act of 1964
A student waiting  for the bus in a small town in Tennessee with other passengers
A student waiting  for the bus in a small town in Tennessee with other passengers
A daily student commuter on a Greyhound bus from Louisville to Memphis. The distance between the cities is just under 400 miles and even today is a five hour drive 
A daily student commuter on a Greyhound bus from Louisville to Memphis. The distance between the cities is just under 400 miles and even today is a five hour drive
A soldier sleeps on a bus from Cincinnati to Louisville. Bus travel in the US had dramatically increased with wartime rationing of rubber and gasoline meaning more people needed to travel but with less options 
A soldier sleeps on a bus from Cincinnati to Louisville. Bus travel in the US had dramatically increased with wartime rationing of rubber and gasoline meaning more people needed to travel but with less options
A packed Greyhound bus from Washington DC to Pittsburgh. The trip would have taken close to five hours by bus but now regular non-stop flights from both airports can take you to and fro in an hour 
A packed Greyhound bus from Washington DC to Pittsburgh. The trip would have taken close to five hours by bus but now regular non-stop flights from both airports can take you to and fro in an hour
A Greyhound station in Indianapolis. A later collection of photos of the United States's bus system earned Bubley the award for Best Picture Sequence in the Encyclopaedia Britannica/University of Missouri School of Journalism 'News Pictures of the Year' in 1948
A Greyhound station in Indianapolis. A later collection of photos of the United States’s bus system earned Bubley the award for Best Picture Sequence in the Encyclopaedia Britannica/University of Missouri School of Journalism ‘News Pictures of the Year’ in 1948
A woman falls asleep while waiting for a bus at the Greyhound terminal in Pittsburgh. According to her webpage for the project she relied on two film cameras: an Ikoflex III and a Linhof Technika with a 5 1/4 inch f/4.5 Zeiss Tessar lens
A woman falls asleep while waiting for a bus at the Greyhound terminal in Pittsburgh. According to her webpage for the project she relied on two film cameras: an Ikoflex III and a Linhof Technika with a 5 1/4 inch f/4.5 Zeiss Tessar lens
Porters load luggage on a bus by chucking with one laucnhing cases in the air to the top of the bus in Chattanooga, Tennessee
Porters load luggage on a bus by chucking with one laucnhing cases in the air to the top of the bus in Chattanooga, Tennessee
A packed out Greyhound terminal in Pittsburgh. In 1943 Franklin D. Roosevelt was president and US troops were engaged in combat in Europe and Asia against Axis powers
A packed out Greyhound terminal in Pittsburgh. In 1943 Franklin D. Roosevelt was president and US troops were engaged in combat in Europe and Asia against Axis powers
A solemn passenger watches luggage being unloaded from a bus that broke down in a small town in Pennsylvania 
A solemn passenger watches luggage being unloaded from a bus that broke down in a small town in Pennsylvania
An army officer clutches a baby's hand as a bus departs from Knoxville, Tennessee for Washington, D.C
An army officer clutches a baby’s hand as a bus departs from Knoxville, Tennessee for Washington, D.C
Scores of passengers lined up to board buses at the Memphis Greyhound station. Bubley's photos of US bus travel in 1943 provide a subtle insight into family life, race segregation and traditional work roles 
Scores of passengers lined up to board buses at the Memphis Greyhound station. Bubley’s photos of US bus travel in 1943 provide a subtle insight into family life, race segregation and traditional work roles
Two men buy Greyhound tickets in Pittsburgh. Bubley joined ordinary Americans on crowded Greyhounds and other buses through major cities and secluded villages 
Two men buy Greyhound tickets in Pittsburgh. Bubley joined ordinary Americans on crowded Greyhounds and other buses through major cities and secluded villages
A black board schedule with chalk markings at a bus depot in Ohio
A black board schedule with chalk markings at a bus depot in Ohio
A young girl gleefully shows a driver her bus ticket from her mouth in Columbus, Ohio 
A young girl gleefully shows a driver her bus ticket from her mouth in Columbus, Ohio
A mother and daughter who sell pillows to travelers in Knoxville pose for Bubley's camera 
A mother and daughter who sell pillows to travelers in Knoxville pose for Bubley’s camera
A worker cleans the wind shield of a bus at the Greyhound garage in Pittsburgh. Bubley would go onto win an honory doctorate from Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1991, seven years before her death aged 77 
A worker cleans the wind shield of a bus at the Greyhound garage in Pittsburgh. Bubley would go onto win an honory doctorate from Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1991, seven years before her death aged 77
A toddler leans out of a scratched Tennessee Coach Company bus in Knoxville
A toddler leans out of a scratched Tennessee Coach Company bus in Knoxville
A woman hails a Macon-bound bus on a gravel highway in Georgia. In 1956 Bubley was hired by Pepsi-Cola International to cover Latin America for their company magazine Panorama. In the mid-1960s, Pan American World Airways sent her on two world tours to capture images for their corporate photographic library
A woman hails a Macon-bound bus on a gravel highway in Georgia. In 1956 Bubley was hired by Pepsi-Cola International to cover Latin America for their company magazine Panorama. In the mid-1960s, Pan American World Airways sent her on two world tours to capture images for their corporate photographic library
A sailor and child wait for a Greyhound in Memphis. Her assignment took four weeks in total in which she captured images that document a bygone era 
A sailor and child wait for a Greyhound in Memphis. Her assignment took four weeks in total in which she captured images that document a bygone era
A worker mops a bus at the Greyhound garage in Pittsburgh. After the project Bubley moved from the OWI to work for Standard Oil where she was entrusted with documenting how the company helped the US wartime effort. The company was accused of colluding with a rival German company during the war and wanted to disprove the claims 
A worker mops a bus at the Greyhound garage in Pittsburgh. After the project Bubley moved from the OWI to work for Standard Oil where she was entrusted with documenting how the company helped the US wartime effort. The company was accused of colluding with a rival German company during the war and wanted to disprove the claims
Despite the change in jobs the snapper was still capture more poignant photos of bus travel in the US. Bubley went on another inter-state assignment taking in more bus stops and passengers. Her end product was the 1947 photo essay, Bus Story, which won numerous awards. Here a soldier sleeps in a luggage rack on a bus from Cincinnati to Louisville.
Despite the change in jobs the snapper was still capture more poignant photos of bus travel in the US. Bubley went on another inter-state assignment taking in more bus stops and passengers. Her end product was the 1947 photo essay, Bus Story, which won numerous awards. Here a soldier sleeps in a luggage rack on a bus from Cincinnati to Louisville.
Passengers laugh during the long journey from Pittsburgh to St. Louis 
Passengers laugh during the long journey from Pittsburgh to St. Louis
Passengers wait to board a Greyhound bus in a small Pennsylvania town 
Passengers wait to board a Greyhound bus in a small Pennsylvania town
Passengers wait for a bus at the Memphis terminal. Bubley was a devoted animal lover and in her later years preferred to take her dogs for walks around New York's Central Park and take photos instead of travelling around the world with on assignments 
Passengers wait for a bus at the Memphis terminal. Bubley was a devoted animal lover and in her later years preferred to take her dogs for walks around New York’s Central Park and take photos instead of travelling around the world with on assignments
An assortment of passengers on the Memphis-Chattanooga Greyhound bus in 1943 
An assortment of passengers on the Memphis-Chattanooga Greyhound bus in 1943
Passengers wait to board a bus from Knoxville, Tennessee to Washington, DC. Bubley went on to become one of the United States's best loved photographers with her work featuring in countless exhibitions across the country. She was also chosen by UNICEF and the French government to travel to Morocco to photograph a program to treat trachoma, an infectious disease that causes blindness
Passengers wait to board a bus from Knoxville, Tennessee to Washington, DC. Bubley went on to become one of the United States’s best loved photographers with her work featuring in countless exhibitions across the country. She was also chosen by UNICEF and the French government to travel to Morocco to photograph a program to treat trachoma, an infectious disease that causes blindness

Source: Daily Mail

Girl Who Suffers From Eczema With Itchy Skin That Would Burn Then Blister Says A Strict Raw Vegan Diet Has Stopped Her Breakouts

Proponents of a vegan diet claim that it can heal or even cure many common ailments. The Mail Online has an interesting story by Kate Pickles about a woman who claims that a raw vegan diet actually cured her blistering eczema.

People who follow a raw vegan diet and lifestyle often say that it can help manage and even cure many health problems. They claim that many common health issues are caused by a non-raw, non-vegan diet. 22-year-old Alice Morgan says her eczema went away when she started eating a very strict raw food vegan diet.

Morgan used to suffer from eczema breakouts that were so severe that they caused her skin to itch and burn, and even blister. Some breakouts left Morgan with bleeding skin and blood all over her clothes.

After trying many medications and treatments, Morgan turned to a raw food vegan diet in desperation. And her breakouts have actually stopped altogether!

a-final
Alice Morgan, 22, would suffer flare-ups causing her skin to feel like it was burning, (left). She says eating nothing but raw fruit and veg has stopped the outbreaks (right)

She shares her experience:

“I would get this feeling like my blood was bubbling with heat, then a bone, deep itch in my skin that I could never reach even when I gave in and scratched it.”

“It would get quite swollen, redden and I’ve have lots of red dots all over my skin – it was really hot and there wasn’t much I could do to cool it down, apart from take Dead Sea salt baths as often as I could.”

“After that my skin would ooze, that was pretty horrible.”

“When I didn’t have much control over the itching, I would often wake up with blood on my sheets and pyjamas.”

“Then there’s a heat which usually came off of my neck, arms and cheeks.”

“In the next stage it would dry out, become scaly and flaky all over my face and body.”

“The flaking stage lasts for days on end, there isn’t a great deal you can do when your skin is like this apart from moisturise, with a pure organic oil like almond or avocado.”

The flare-ups started in childhood but returned three years ago when she was at university
The flare-ups started in childhood but returned three years ago when she was at university
Her skin would break out in agonising red blotches before scaling over and developing blisters (left) but after switching her diet, her arms have cleared up (right)
Her skin would break out in agonising red blotches before scaling over and developing blisters (left) but after switching her diet, her arms have cleared up (right)
During severe attacks, she became so self-conscious she did not want to leave her home
During severe attacks, she became so self-conscious she did not want to leave her home

Miss Morgan adds:

“It was really hard to deal with, in the past I have felt lonely, awkward, low, uncomfortable, antisocial, ugly, anxious, the list goes on.”

Despite doctors prescribing her steroids, her condition only worsened:

“It was out of control, over my face and arms, I’d never had it on my legs before too.”

“People don’t understand how severe eczema can get, it’s not just little patches behind the knees, elbows, it spreads all over my body.”

“There’s no hiding it really, which makes you feel self-conscious and awkward in social situations.”

c-final
The flare-ups would go through fazes of feeling burning hot then would dry out, become scaly and flaky all over her face and body (right)

Miss Morgan had lost hope until three months ago, when she started a grain-free, raw vegan diet – eating only raw fruit and vegetables for her three meals a day. She says that vegan diet has stopped the flare-ups and gave her healthier skin:

“It’s a very, very restrictive diet but I feel the best I have done in a long time,” she said.

“It got to the point where I was prepared to do anything to get better again.”

“At the moment I’m trying to stick to my raw vegan diet, I don’t eat any grains and 80 per cent of everything I eat is raw.”

“I’ve seen results since day one and although it’s a tough diet to follow it seems to be worth it, I just hope I can maintain it.”

“Before, I felt like eczema had taken my life away, but I am now determined to get it back and be able to live a normal life like before my flare-ups.”

“I have enough creams and lotions to open a pharmacy, but now since discovering my new diet I’m choosing to keep everything as natural as possible.”

ECZEMA SUFFERER HEALS WITH FRUIT
Miss Morgan now believes she is 80 per cent healed

“I am a true believer that the correct diet can cure any disease or illness”.

Read More: Eczema sufferer whose itchy skin would burn then blister says a strict vegan diet of RAW fruit and veg has stopped her breakouts

Young Millionare Winner Is Planning To Sue Lottery Bosses For ‘Ruining’ Her Life

Britain’s youngest lottery winner has revealed she is planning to take legal action against lottery bosses for negligence.

Jane Park, who won £1m ($1,23 m) at the age of 17, said winning the windfall had “ruined” her life and she often thought things would have been better if she had never won.

Now 21, she argued that someone of her age should not have been allowed to win such a substantial sum of money. She said 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery and suggested the current limit of 16 was too young.

She said she had become bored of relentless consumption and felt like it failed to offered long-term genuine happiness. Before winning the lottery, Park, who now owns two properties, worked as an admin temp for £8 ($9.89) an hour and lived in a small flat with her mother.

Jane Park lottery winner working in a chippy

“I thought it would make it 10 times better but it’s made it 10 times worse. I wish I had no money most days. I say to myself, ‘My life would be so much easier if I hadn’t won’,” she told reporters.

“People look at me and think, ‘I wish I had her lifestyle, I wish I had her money.’ But they don’t realize the extent of my stress. I have material things but apart from that my life is empty. What is my purpose in life?”

“I think 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery, at the least. The current age of 16 is far too young.”

Ms Park, who now owns two properties and calls herself a developer, said: 'I thought it would make it ten times better but it’s made it ten times worse' 

Despite the fact that the organization which runs the lottery appointed an adviser to help Park deal with her newly accumulated wealth, she said it was family advice that helped her keep her spending in check.

“I’ve read about other lottery winners who’ve just blown it all and I can totally see how it can be done,” she said. “I was stuck in front of a financial adviser who was using words like investment bonds. I had no clue what they meant.”

She said it was unsettling how differently her life had turned out from her friends, making her feel isolated.

“It’s scary how different my life is from my friends’. When they say they’re stressed about the money they mean their wages are s***,” she said. “There’s no one in the same boat as me, no one who really understands. I feel like I’m a 40-year-old.”

A spokesperson for the organization told reporters, “[the organization] takes its duty of care to winners very seriously and all major winners are offered support and advice for as long as they wish. That support is tailored to each winner’s situation and circumstances – and for younger winners, their age will obviously be an important factor in the advice and support offered.  

“Following her win, the young woman received extensive support from [the organization],” it continued. “A dedicated winners’ adviser visited her at home to pay out her prize, arrange private banking and support her through the publicity when she chose to share news of her win. An independent financial and legal panel was set up shortly after her win and we put her in touch with another winner who won at the same age, to share their experience and help her adjust to the win.

“We keep in contact with all major winners for as long as they wish and have been in touch with the young woman in question from time to time since her win to offer ongoing support. Of course, it is always up to the winners themselves as to whether they want to take us up that ongoing support and advice – but the door is always open and we will continue to support her in any way we can if that is what decides she wants.”

The organization said the minimum age limit to play the lottery was an issue for the government to deal with.

“Anyone over the age of 16 can play the lottery, and therefore win a prize,” they said in a statement. “The organization doesn’t set the age limit to play – this was agreed at the launch of the lottery back in 1994 and so any questions about the legal age to play would be a matter for government.”

While most who play the lottery fantasize about the moment of winning the jackpot, the reality of winning can be more complicated. There are numerous stories of lottery winners who have struggled to get used to quitting their jobs and becoming rich overnight.

Another young woman, who was 16 and earning £3.60 ($4.45) an hour when she won a lottery jackpot worth almost £1,875,000 ($2.3m) in 2003, struggled to adjust to her newfound wealth. She went on a spending spree and is reported to have tried to kill herself.

Ironically, she has said she is much happier now she has spent her fortune. “I don’t think of myself as a lottery winner – I try to forget the ups and downs I’ve been through and just feel like a normal person,” she explained in 2013.

“It was too much money for someone so young. Even if you say your life won’t change, it does – and often not for the better.”

Extraordinary Wedding Photos Spanning 150 Years Chart The Dramatic Change In Bridal Fashions

This fascinating exhibition of wedding photographs show just how much the outfits have changed over the years.

The exhibition – shown at Strode Theatre – was as a farewell tribute to manager Liz Leyshon on her retirement. Liz had asked for pictorial contributions and was amazed at the response she got.

Going back as far as 150 years, the collection shows how formal the wedding were, with very staid and unsmiling poses from most people. Dress was very formal, with men in top hats and ladies with high collars and long sleeves.

This picture from 1870 shows the wedding of Anne Austin and Reginald Porch. Wedding Fashions Through The Decades, at Strode Theatre in the village of Street, Somerset showcases a collection of pictures showing wedding groups 
This picture from 1870 shows the wedding of Anne Austin and Reginald Porch. Wedding Fashions Through The Decades, at Strode Theatre in the village of Street, Somerset showcases a collection of pictures showing wedding groups
This picture from 1895 shows the wedding of Jane Murray and John Gillespie. The exhibition has been a farewell labour-of-love by long-serving theatre manager Liz Leyshon before she retires in March 
This picture from 1895 shows the wedding of Jane Murray and John Gillespie. The exhibition has been a farewell labour-of-love by long-serving theatre manager Liz Leyshon before she retires in March
This picture from 1909 shows the wedding of Margaret Clark and Arthur Gillett. When outgoing Strode Theatre manager Liz Leyshon looked for pictorial contributions from friends, she said she was overwhelmed by the response
This picture from 1909 shows the wedding of Margaret Clark and Arthur Gillett. When outgoing Strode Theatre manager Liz Leyshon looked for pictorial contributions from friends, she said she was overwhelmed by the response
How times have changed: This 1919 image shows the wedding of Rosetta May Evemy and Francis John Witcombe. Strode Theatre patrons, friends and colleagues brought in their own photos as well as those of their parents and ancestors
How times have changed: This 1919 image shows the wedding of Rosetta May Evemy and Francis John Witcombe. Strode Theatre patrons, friends and colleagues brought in their own photos as well as those of their parents and ancestors
Floral theme: This picture from 1921 shows the wedding of Linda Field and Clarence Perry. The exhibition comprises moving, funny and fascinating details of the lives of the people in the photographs, which emerged with virtually every picture
Floral theme: This picture from 1921 shows the wedding of Linda Field and Clarence Perry. The exhibition comprises moving, funny and fascinating details of the lives of the people in the photographs, which emerged with virtually every picture
Hats and hemlines: This extraordinary photo from 1932 shows the nuptials of Nell Clark and John Harley Young (centre). Some of the photos were kindly loaned by local archives, including the Alfred Gillett Trust
Hats and hemlines: This extraordinary photo from 1932 shows the nuptials of Nell Clark and John Harley Young (centre). Some of the photos were kindly loaned by local archives, including the Alfred Gillett Trust
Wartime wedding: This 1940 image shows the wedding of Reginald Webber and Margaret Sandy. The pictures are displayed chronologically, illustrating the huge developments and changes in photography as well as in fashion and society
Wartime wedding: This 1940 image shows the wedding of Reginald Webber and Margaret Sandy. The pictures are displayed chronologically, illustrating the huge developments and changes in photography as well as in fashion and society

Early pictures show the development and change from Victorian corsets to 1020 dropped waist dresses. Morning suits and wartime uniforms were the style in the thirties and forties, while in the fifties the waist lines changed.

Lace galore: A picture taken in 1943 shows the nuptials of Edward Moran and Margaret Hewitt. The stunning photographs show huge developments from Victorian corsets to twenties dropped waists and elegant ankles
Lace galore: A picture taken in 1943 shows the nuptials of Edward Moran and Margaret Hewitt. The stunning photographs show huge developments from Victorian corsets to twenties dropped waists and elegant ankles
Broad-rimmed hats and shorter hemlines: This picture from 1944 shows perhaps the biggest shift in fashions at the wedding of Joan Hobbs and George Goodenough
Broad-rimmed hats and shorter hemlines: This picture from 1944 shows perhaps the biggest shift in fashions at the wedding of Joan Hobbs and George Goodenough
Special day: A recently unearthed photograph from 1947 shows the wedding of Beryl Gould and Norman Tucker. Friends, family and patrons of the theatre contributed images from the weddings of their parents and ancestors
Special day: A recently unearthed photograph from 1947 shows the wedding of Beryl Gould and Norman Tucker. Friends, family and patrons of the theatre contributed images from the weddings of their parents and ancestors
Church wedding: This image from 1950 shows the wedding of Pamela Adams, dressed in a sweeping white gown, and Brendan Sadler, flanked by two adorable flower girls dressed in matching coats
Church wedding: This image from 1950 shows the wedding of Pamela Adams, dressed in a sweeping white gown, and Brendan Sadler, flanked by two adorable flower girls dressed in matching coats

In the sixties dresses mini dresses were all the rage, and this was often carried over into the wedding dress style. The seventies boasted very lacy and floral arrangements, such as the Princess of Wales’ marriage.

Since then wedding dress has changed to informal styles in registry office events, and sleek looking, colour co-ordinated wedding we see today.

The veil makes a comeback while guests opt for elaborate headgear in this picture from 1961 showing the wedding of Rachel Small and Malcolm Humphries, part of the stunning collection of images which will go on display this week
The veil makes a comeback while guests opt for elaborate headgear in this picture from 1961 showing the wedding of Rachel Small and Malcolm Humphries, part of the stunning collection of images which will go on display this week
Changing fashions: This picture from 1966 shows the wedding of Bert Bryant and Sandra Lane. The fascinating photos show lavish high society unions to cheerful family parties, with adorable bridesmaids and stern-looking mothers-in-law
Changing fashions: This picture from 1966 shows the wedding of Bert Bryant and Sandra Lane. The fascinating photos show lavish high society unions to cheerful family parties, with adorable bridesmaids and stern-looking mothers-in-law
This picture from 1968 shows the wedding of Valerie Redwood and Petty Officer Richard Appleby, with the bridesmaids and flower girls showcasing elaborate hairstyles
This picture from 1968 shows the wedding of Valerie Redwood and Petty Officer Richard Appleby, with the bridesmaids and flower girls showcasing elaborate hairstyles
Purple theme: This image from 1972 shows the wedding of Dinah Tucker and Rodney Gifford with guests dressed in bold purple prints and the bridesmaids in paisley
Purple theme: This image from 1972 shows the wedding of Dinah Tucker and Rodney Gifford with guests dressed in bold purple prints and the bridesmaids in paisley
Draping, ruching and puffy sleeves feature heavily in this quintessentially 1983 image depicting the wedding of Meryl Sian Davies and Ross Everson, with guests sticking to a pale blue colour scheme
Draping, ruching and puffy sleeves feature heavily in this quintessentially 1983 image depicting the wedding of Meryl Sian Davies and Ross Everson, with guests sticking to a pale blue colour scheme
And the bride wore... pink! This picture from 1987 shows the wedding of Sue Hart and Mark Nicholson-Lailey
And the bride wore… pink! This picture from 1987 shows the wedding of Sue Hart and Mark Nicholson-Lailey

Headwear has also changed from traditional veils, to hats, and then back to veils. Floral arrangements have changed from huge bouquets to smaller posies, with flowers in head wear occasionally.

This picture from 1990 shows the wedding of Sandra Walker and Mark Healey. The exhibition opens to the public on Valentine's Day and will run until April 8
This picture from 1990 shows the wedding of Sandra Walker and Mark Healey. The exhibition opens to the public on Valentine’s Day and will run until April 8
This picture from 2000 shows the wedding of Shirley Cary and Graham Theedom. The pictures are displayed chronologically, showing every detail and illustrating the developments and changes in photography as well as in fashion and society
This picture from 2000 shows the wedding of Shirley Cary and Graham Theedom. The pictures are displayed chronologically, showing every detail and illustrating the developments and changes in photography as well as in fashion and society

Shorter hemlines and brighter colours are more the norm now, in fact it sometimes seems that anything goes! The collection is a great glimpse into the way weddings, and wedding outfits used to be.

Shorter hemlines: This picture from 2000 shows the wedding of Shirley Cary and Graham Theedom. When Liz looked for pictorial contributions, she was overwhelmed by the response
Shorter hemlines: This picture from 2000 shows the wedding of Shirley Cary and Graham Theedom. When Liz looked for pictorial contributions, she was overwhelmed by the response

Source: Daily Mail

The World’s Most Tourist-Friendly Countries Revealed!

Every two years the World Economic Forum ranks countries for being the most tourist friendly places to visit.

This year the top place went to Spain, with it’s cultural and natural offerings as well as the infrastructure which is geared towards tourism. Following Spain came France, despite the terrorist activities which have taken place there recently.

Germany came in at third place, Japan came up from 9th place to 4th place, while 5th place went to the UK. The US was just behind the UK in 6th, while Australia, Italy, Canada and Switzerland followed.

Spain has been crowned the world’s most tourist-friendly country in a prestigious biennial report thanks to its cultural and natural offerings, along with its top tourism infrastructure and airline connectivity
Spain has been crowned the world’s most tourist-friendly country in a prestigious biennial report thanks to its cultural and natural offerings, along with its top tourism infrastructure and airline connectivity
Despite the terrorist atrocities that have blighted France in recent years, it defeated its European rivals to take second place, buoyed by its cultural strengths
Despite the terrorist atrocities that have blighted France in recent years, it defeated its European rivals to take second place, buoyed by its cultural strengths

This year there were 136 countries which were considered, and factors which influenced the decisions were policies that influenced travel and tourism, and policies which contributed to a country’s development.

The top ten countries which have been selected are those which have successfully created an environment for travel, have promoted their natural and cultural heritage, and work towards ensuring rewarding experiences for tourists.

Such factors as Hygiene, safety and security are also included, as is information technology. Scores on all points are then averaged out to find the top country.

Some interesting points that came to light were that Europe had the strongest travel competitiveness in the world, with 1.2 billion tourists visiting during 2016. it was thought that the reason for this were the health and hygiene standards, as well as safety and cultural richness.

Japan received the award for the most improved country followed by Azerbaijan and Tajikistan. The reason Japan had improved so much was because of the unique cultural appeal, and also the the excellent means of business travel.

While the UK maintained its fifth position overall, it only scored 78th in the safety and security section of the report
While the UK maintained its fifth position overall, it only scored 78th in the safety and security section of the report

As far as safety goes, both the UK and the US were disappointing, being in 78th and 84th place respectively.

The safest tourist destination was in fact Finland, closely followed by United Arab Emirates and Iceland in 3rd place. In 4th place for the safest place on earth we find Oman, followed by Hong Kong, Singapore, Norway, Switzerland, Rwanda and Qatar.

At the very bottom of the combined rankings were Yemen, Chad, Burundi and the Congo.

TOP 10 SAFETY AND SECURITY RANKING

    1. Finland 6.65
    2. United Arab Emirates 6.60
    3. Iceland 6.57
    4. Oman 6.49
    5. Hong Kong SAR 6.47
    6. Singapore 6.45
    7. Norway 6.41
    8. Switzerland 6.41
    9. Rwanda 6.39
    10. Qatar 6.33

World Economic Forum 2017

Source: Daily Mail

Captivating Photo Series Reveals Bali In The 1970s – Before Tourism Exploded

Back in 1975 and 1977 when Chris White travelled there, Bali, Indonesia was virtually unknown. It certainly was not a ‘hot’ tourist destination. It was so unknown that the locals had never seen westerners before. The landscape was pristine and the beaches spotlessly clean.

Things have changed in time, and not for the best, it seems. Bali is now a magnet for backpackers and party goers, and the beautiful white beaches are now littered with rubbish. Congestion and mounting piles of trash is a huge problem.

Rewind the clock to the 1970’s and you will see the collection of photos that White took when he was first there. Untouched areas, white beaches, quiet dirt track roads, with no westerners to be seen was what you could expect if you visited the island.

The collection of images showcases a rural existence and a peaceful way of life. This is a complete change from now, with the island being invaded by some 4 million tourists a year!

Before the tourists arrived: Australian surfer and photographer Clifford White, 62, travelled to the virtually unknown island when he was 20 in 1975 with several friends (above, Sanur beach, which is now a popular resort town)
Before the tourists arrived: Australian surfer and photographer Clifford White, 62, travelled to the virtually unknown island when he was 20 in 1975 with several friends (above, Sanur beach, which is now a popular resort town)
Making a splash: During his stay, White shot images of the rural landscape and a number of Balinese locals who had never even met Westerners before
Making a splash: During his stay, White shot images of the rural landscape and a number of Balinese locals who had never even met Westerners before
Jungle trek: White said some people paid a small fee to have their surf boards carried out to the ocean. He added that the man in the foreground of the above shot, barefoot under the straw hat, is former Australian politician Ian Cohen
Jungle trek: White said some people paid a small fee to have their surf boards carried out to the ocean. He added that the man in the foreground of the above shot, barefoot under the straw hat, is former Australian politician Ian Cohen
Flashback: White said he found Jalan Tegal Wangi (above) such a 'nice sleepy small street' when he visited Bali in March 1975 but today it is one of the busiest parts of Kuta beach, with modern buildings and a tarmac road 
Flashback: White said he found Jalan Tegal Wangi (above) such a ‘nice sleepy small street’ when he visited Bali in March 1975 but today it is one of the busiest parts of Kuta beach, with modern buildings and a tarmac road
Authentic: Kuta beach is now a bustling tourist spot flooded with sightseers. When White visited in the late 70s, he said he encountered small markets, 'selling only local products, long before the days of fake products'
Authentic: Kuta beach is now a bustling tourist spot flooded with sightseers. When White visited in the late 70s, he said he encountered small markets, ‘selling only local products, long before the days of fake products’

Thinking back on his first visits, White said that he and his friends were the first Australians to ever visit Bali. The island is now littered with tall hotels and resorts. It is a surfer’s dream come true.

Reminiscing about his early travels, White, from Sydney, said:

“Back then we were some of the first Australians to visit Bali. “It was totally unspoiled. The island has developed a lot since then and Kuta beach now has hotels and resorts the length of it.”

“It was every surfer’s dream and and the locals were the friendliest people you could ever meet,” he said.

Still undiscovered: White notes that a large resort now sits off the road where he took this shot (left), meanwhile on the beach he was happy to pay locals a small fee to carry his surf board through the wild terrain (right)
Relaxed pace of life: A quiet road leading down to the now wildly-popular Kuta beach (left) and local girls carrying food supplies down to the beach ahead of a day of surfing (right)
Dying businesses: White returned to this store in 2011 but he found it had disappeared, with lots of tourist stores in its place and a Hard Rock Cafe within walking distance 
Dying businesses: White returned to this store in 2011 but he found it had disappeared, with lots of tourist stores in its place and a Hard Rock Cafe within walking distance
Self-portrait: White sits to have his photo taken while a small monkey perches on his shoulders  
Self-portrait: White sits to have his photo taken while a small monkey perches on his shoulders
Catching some waves: White says he remembers catching some 'nice, clean' barrels during his trip to Bali in April 1977 (above, pictured in the waters off Uluwatu)
Catching some waves: White says he remembers catching some ‘nice, clean’ barrels during his trip to Bali in April 1977 (above, pictured in the waters off Uluwatu)

The main airport carries 11.1 million people there every year, with the majority of holiday- makers being backpackers, couples and surfers. White says that it is very scary at just how busy the island has become. The green lands that he saw before have all been filled with beach resorts and the airport construction.

At your service: Some of White's fondest memories involved surf trips in the Nusa Dua area of southern Bali. He said they would 'park in a field with no buildings except the small shack that served drinks and snacks. The drivers would wait for hours while we surfed, and they were very honest - I would leave my camera with them'
At your service: Some of White’s fondest memories involved surf trips in the Nusa Dua area of southern Bali. He said they would ‘park in a field with no buildings except the small shack that served drinks and snacks. The drivers would wait for hours while we surfed, and they were very honest – I would leave my camera with them’
No cares in the world: White said he was struck by the ‘happy and smiling faces of the beautiful children’ (left), he was also enthralled by a coastal cave he discovered during a return trip to the Indonesian island in April 1977 (right)
Chilled vibe: White said he would see this 'very laid back' fortune teller just about every day on Jalan Pantai Kuta - a road close to Kuta beach 
Chilled vibe: White said he would see this ‘very laid back’ fortune teller just about every day on Jalan Pantai Kuta – a road close to Kuta beach
All green and then it was gone: White captured this view as he came in to land at Denpasar International Airport in March 1975. It was his first trip to the 'beautiful unspoilt island'. Today, monster resorts are peppered along the coast line
All green and then it was gone: White captured this view as he came in to land at Denpasar International Airport in March 1975. It was his first trip to the ‘beautiful unspoilt island’. Today, monster resorts are peppered along the coast line
Country walks: White came across a farmer casually walking ducks, somewhere close to the town of Ubud, in the uplands of Bali
Country walks: White came across a farmer casually walking ducks, somewhere close to the town of Ubud, in the uplands of Bali

The iconic collection of pictures takes us back to times when life was a far slower pace, families were important, and there was far less hustle and bustle.

White recently shared the pictures of his early Balinese trips on social media and one of the boys in the shots recognised himself and got in touch.

“One of the children in the pictures is now in his 40s,” he said.

“He recognised the shots from when he was younger and got in touch. That was pretty incredible.”

Footsteps in the foam: A group of local surfers head out to the water to catch some waves on Kuta beach, widely considered one of the best ocean fronts in Bali
Footsteps in the foam: A group of local surfers head out to the water to catch some waves on Kuta beach, widely considered one of the best ocean fronts in Bali
Group outing: White met a local man called Wayan Dartayasa and his family at their home in Kuta beach. It appears that they are sourcing fresh water from a well
Footsteps in the foam: A group of local surfers head out to the water to catch some waves on Kuta beach, widely considered one of the best ocean fronts in Bali
Hustle and bustle: White took a photo capturing the first time he arrived in the Indonesian capital of Denpasar via a local bemo bus. He said he found it 'scary' how busy the place was even then
Hustle and bustle: White took a photo capturing the first time he arrived in the Indonesian capital of Denpasar via a local bemo bus. He said he found it ‘scary’ how busy the place was even then
Rise in popularity: Bali was marketed as a 'tropical paradise' in glossy tourist brochures and travel websites during the 80s and 90s. It soon became the 'Mexico of Australia', with flights from Sydney taking around six hours
Rise in popularity: Bali was marketed as a ‘tropical paradise’ in glossy tourist brochures and travel websites during the 80s and 90s. It soon became the ‘Mexico of Australia’, with flights from Sydney taking around six hours
Smiles all round: White appears to be surrounded by a bevy of beautiful women as he heads to the water to surf
Smiles all round: White appears to be surrounded by a bevy of beautiful women as he heads to the water to surf
Moment of reflection: White takes a break from surfing on the cliffs of Uluwatu and snaps a quick photo of a local  
Moment of reflection: White takes a break from surfing on the cliffs of Uluwatu and snaps a quick photo of a local

Bali, in South East Asia, is one of the world’s most popular tropical holiday spots.

In the 80’s and 90’s it was known as a ‘tropical paradise’ but recently it is better known as ‘the Mexico of Australia’ with flights taking around six hours.

In 2000, the island’s main airport carried 4.4 million passengers and by 2011, this number had skyrocketed to 11.1 million

Source: Daily Mail

Hypnotizing Mandala Cakes Made Of Raw Vegan Ingredients

Whether you follow a vegan diet or not, you just have to take a look at these pictures of gorgeous, trippy raw food vegan mandala cakes posted by Dainius on Bored Panda

A mandala is a spiritual ritual symbol that is often used in Indian religions, and it represents the universe. The word “mandala” has been adopted to mean any chart or diagram that represents the cosmos. Tibetan Buddhist monks create sand mandalas with small grains of colored sand. Now a Los Angeles-based raw food vegan chef, Stephen McCarty, has started making mandala cakes. And they are made from completely raw vegan foods, of course.

These mandala cakes are truly works of art, full of beautiful colors and complex patterns. And not only do they look beautiful, they taste amazing too. The colors used in McCarty’s cakes are all made from natural plant and fruit extracts. McCarthy makes his mandala cakes in a variety of different flavors, such as Coconut Caramel Cacao, Lavender Lemon Blueberry, Banana Jungle Nut Butter Chocolate Cheesecake, and Coconut Lime Raw Vegan Cheesecake.

More info: Instagram (h/t: beautifuldecay)

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Source: Bored Panda